Pime

It's all part of a cosmic unconsciousness.

Let me propose the following neo-Stoical attitude to the problem, which will no doubt ease the psychic pain of the next OMG-my-data-has-gone-from-a-“free”-service! controversy. If your data exists only as hosted by “free” services on the internet, you should assume not only that it’s not your data, but that it doesn’t even exist at all. That way, you’ll be less upset when one day it vanishes without trace, and you can greet personal erasure with splendid equanimity.

lnthefade:

throwback thursday to before I was scarred for life.

lnthefade:

throwback thursday to before I was scarred for life.

'An inner process stands in need of outward criteria,' runs one of the most often quoted aphorisms of Philosophical Investigations. It is less often realised what emphasis Wittgenstein placed on the need for sensitive perception of those 'outward criteria' in all their imponderability. And where does one find such acute sensitivity? Not, typically, in the works of psychologists, but in those of the great artists, musicians and novelists. 'People nowadays,' Wittgenstein writes in Culture and Value, 'think that scientists exist to instruct them, poets, musicians, etc. to give them pleasure. The idea that these have something to teach them-that does not occur to them.'

Ray Monk in Prospect. Wittgenstein’s forgotten lesson

Wittgenstein’s philosophy is at odds with the scientism which dominates our times. Ray Monk explains why his thought is still relevant.

(via protoslacker)

Patrick Stewart wins the ice bucket challenge.

(Source: youtube.com)